Hyponik

Evigt Mörker: In Conversation

There’s no doubt that Northern Electronics is one of the most intriguing projects in contemporary Techno. A tightly knit family of Swedish artists, the label owes its success to a uniquely introspective sound and a staunchly self-reliant ethos.

From co-founder Varg’s jumped-up ‘Anti Police Music,’ to the rasping abstraction of CA2+’s ambient pieces, Northern Electronics unifies an impressive variety of musical approaches under one central theme: a brooding Scandinavian melancholy.

The ‘Evigt Mörker’ project (‘eternal darkness,’ in Swedish) has been steadily evolving since 2013. Releases on Semantica and Northern Electronics boast an unparalleled talent for fusing thickets of drums into psychedelic loops. His melodies are wrought with the agony and the ecstasy of nature, woven into galloping rhythms to mimic a ritualistic pursuit through dense percussive forest-scapes.

This month he’s due to release ‘Krona’, his third offering on Northern Electronics and his first album-length project under this moniker. From start to finish, ‘Krona’ is a set of floor-ready tracks that are caustic yet organic – a key feature to Evigt Mörker’s pursuant, vampiristic sound.

We had a chat to the producer behind Evigt Mörker ahead of the LP’s release.

How long has ‘Krona’ been in the works – what led you to release an LP after so many years of smaller projects?

It was just a natural step after releasing a bunch of EPs. It has been a long time coming, I think I’ve scrapped 2-3 ideas for an album before, going so far as to having all the tracks ready for mastering before realizing they were not good enough. ‘Krona’ was completed early this year, most of the tracks are from last year.

What’s your production process?

I try to experiment as much as I can with whatever I can get my hands on really. I get bored easily, so for me it’s impossible to describe any type of process, it’s different every time.

Your music seems strongly influenced by nature. How would you say your relationship to landscapes affects your creative process?

Nature encompasses everything, from pure nostalgia to the need for freedom to the sheer enjoyment of beauty. It’s difficult to pinpoint what exactly influences my music but it most definitely has an effect.

Northern Electronics seems like a perfect fit for releasing your music – how did you come into contact, and how has your relationship to the label shaped your sound?

Nature encompasses everything, from pure nostalgia to the need for freedom to the sheer enjoyment of beauty. It’s difficult to pinpoint what exactly influences my music but it most definitely has an effect.

Northern Electronics seems like a perfect fit for releasing your music – how did you come into contact, and how has your relationship to the label shaped your sound?

I remember meeting Anthony in 2014 to buy some ARR records. After that, we stayed in touch. He had heard some music I’d made under a different name so he asked me to start sending stuff, we built up a relationship from there. I think what’s great with NE and what undoubtedly has affected my sound is that there are really no boundaries. I had that restlessness and strive to always keep pushing before but it has grown greater as my relationship with NE has developed.

Northern Electronics’ output has a distinctive melancholy to it, yet your approach seems to flirt with a sense of salvation, even ecstasy – particularly in your melodies. How do you find that fusion between nature and monochromatic machine music?

My first experiences with rave culture were out in nature listening to machine music, so combining the two comes very naturally to me – it’s a perfect fusion. I’ve always been drawn to that kind of ambiguity in everything I consume, whether it’s books, music, films, whatever. I think my need for multi-faceted art transpired to my own compositions. Regarding the motifs and themes: I leave that for the listener to decide.

How would you describe your relationship with the dance floor as a DJ? Most Techno seems designed to pummel the listener head-on.

This correlates to what I talked about before – not liking experiences that are one-dimensional. I try to adhere to this philosophy when I play records as well. I think you also have to try to build an atmosphere of expectation, a sense that anything can happen. So that’s what I try to do.

Are there any recent gigs that’ve stood out to you recently?

My last gig was at Blank in Saint Petersburg, which was really nice. I had two wonderful hosts who showed me around the city and I met some lovely people. A great experience. Regarding favourite spots, I have a few. For me it often comes down to the people behind the club – if they’re nice and serious then it usually is a good evening for me. I’ve been very fortunate to travel and meet some great people.

Your recent Slam Radio mix seemed peppered with forthcoming tracks from ‘Krona’ and gritty ‘90s oldies – what’re some gems in your record bag at the moment?

I try to buy records as much as I can so it changes a lot. Recently, I’ve rediscovered Continual, such a brilliant label. Other than that I play a lot of music that my friends send to me.

You’ve mentioned ‘90s Stockholm as an inspiration of yours – are there any lesser-known Swedish artists keeping that sound alive?

In general, Swedish artists are good at looking forward, not dwelling on the past. I think that’s great. It’s not good if too much focus is placed on what has happened, more energy should be spent on striving forward. I don’t know how much weight that statement gets coming from a guy who just released a mix full of Techno from the 90s but still, I try to look ahead and there are some Swedish and foreign artists doing it too. They inspire me.

Evigt Mörker – Krona is out now on Northern Electronics. 

Buy it here

Words: Alex Davidson

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